Tagged: Advertisements

Third-party Mobile Ads – Not Exactly a Christmas Miracle

People are in the buying mood. It’s the holiday season and everyone’s looking for the perfect gifts for friends and family members. This is the time of year that advertisers relish. People are just waiting to spend their money and if your product is decent enough, making sales can be like shooting fish in a barrel.

Unfortunately for Facebook, Mashable reports that rather than cashing in on the spending spirit, the social giant announced a halt on testing for their third-party mobile ad network. The ad network focuses on advertising within third-party mobile apps and could be compared to Google’s AdSense – the hope being that Facebook could significantly increase its ad volume without overwhelming its own mobile app users with advertisements.

Facebook – still searching for a way to leverage its more than 1 BILLION users to generate significant profits – is once again experiencing frustration and mild defeat. While still the largest social network in the world, their troubles are steadily becoming just as big.

Still embroiled in yet another privacy kerfuffle, it wouldn’t surprise me if this delay was the last straw and Zuckerberg swapped out his trademark grey hoodie for something even gloomier.

As for us Facebook and mobile app users, I’m not sure if this is a win or a loss. On the one hand, I’m not thrilled about Facebook cramming even more advertisements down my digital throat. But on the other hand, I’m beginning to detest the full-page, poor quality advertisements that keep popping up while I’m trying to get over 500,000 points on Subway Surfer.

“No, I do not want to buy ‘Dessert Maker’, thank you very much.”

So if Facebook develops a better way to display advertisements on mobile and can make them more targeted, I guess I would be open to that change, seeing as mobile advertising is an inevitability.

Either way, Facebook cannot be happy about the last week or so. Plagued by privacy issues and now forced to reallocate resources from their promising new ad platform to address their current Facebook-mobile ad woes, the holiday season seems to be a bit of a let-down for poor Facebook. And seeing as this is the season of giving, I think we should all help out everyone’s favorite social giant by clicking on a Facebook Timeline ad. Perhaps we can’t do anything about their mobile ad issues, but if we can find it in our hearts to spare a click, maybe we can help Scrooge McZuck have a merry Christmas, after-all.

p.s. Happy holidays from SUM :)

One Small Click for Man, One Giant Leap for…LinkedIn

Well, it took over 9,000 impressions, but SUM has finally received its first click on a LinkedIn ad! If you’re just joining us, I’m referring to the month-long saga that I wrote about here. Needless to say, we’re relieved that something has finally come from all of our efforts. 

So what made the difference? Well, we think it’s a couple of things. We were actually encouraged by one of our readers, Ellyce, to contact an account rep at LinkedIn to make sure there wasn’t anything technically wrong with our campaign. Thinking this to be an excellent suggestion, I reached out to the LinkedIn Customer Experience Team and led them through the experience we had been having with their ad service. I received a very prompt reply from an account representative named Julien, who was extremely friendly and helpful.

He began by offering up an apology for the experience we were having thus far (even though he knew LinkedIn hadn’t really done anything wrong) and continued by confirming that there wasn’t anything wrong with the campaign on the technical side. Obviously this was both relieving and disheartening.

He then offered up several suggestions for how we could improve our campaign. A lot of the ideas were slightly more detailed explanations of the LinkedIn advertising best practices that we had already found on their website, but he also provided some information that, in my opinion, proved to be the difference in the campaign, moving forward.

He let me know that, while our $2.13 bid per click was within LinkedIn’s suggested price range for the group we were targeting, it was at the lowest end of the spectrum and was affecting how many impressions we were receiving. He said that by increasing our bid by just a little, we would win more impressions on users’ profiles and should, therefore, receive more clicks. This suggestion seemed to once again confirm that online advertising is about playing the numbers and that more impressions will usually lead to more clicks.

So I took his advice and moved my bid up to $3.00 per click. Our impressions almost tripled within less than a week and we received our first click as a result. And the ad that did it? Believe it or not, it was the cat!

Cat Ad

Just goes to show that sometimes an out-of-the-box approach is required to grab attention on the internet.

And while a 0.019% Click Through Rate is still pretty atrocious, we are encouraged and content. After all, this is an experiment that we’re conducting for free with a $50 LinkedIn advertising credit, so the knowledge that we’re gaining more than makes up for a pitiful CTR.

Many thanks to Ellyce for suggesting we contact someone at LinkedIn and also to Julien for responding quickly and courteously, and for shedding a little light on the ins and outs of LinkedIn advertising.

Have any LinkedIn stories of your own? What do you like/dislike about this social giant? As always, let me know in the comments section!